Why Do You Want God To Bless You? | Attitudes To Breakthrough

Today’s blog post is inspired by a sermon given by a guest pastor at my church a little while ago now. Something the pastor said really struck a chord with me and I instantly felt convicted to share what God was telling me. Essentially the pastor’s message was about “breakthrough” and our attitudes towards it. Breakthrough is a term you’ll hear used a lot by Christians. But what exactly does that mean?

A breakthrough is success in a particular area or activity (especially after a long wait/previous failure), so it’s no surprise that it is such a popular prayer point. Who doesn’t want to be successful! But I think it’s interesting that we’re so fixated with success and achieving our breakthrough in this life when the Bible is very clear about the trials and battles we will face for the sake of following Christ. It isn’t all rainbows and glitter. Yes, God is the author and finisher of any kind of breakthrough, but the real question of the day is, why do you want it? And if you got it, what would you do with it? Here’s some food for thought on the topic… Continue reading “Why Do You Want God To Bless You? | Attitudes To Breakthrough”

Advertisements

3 Things YOU Should Do Before The Year Ends!

Hey guys, welcome to December 🙂

Let me cut to the chase. At the end of last year I wrote a summary of what I learned. So this year, I want to share 3 key things that I propose we should all do before the clock strikes midnight on January 1st. Let’s go!

Continue reading “3 Things YOU Should Do Before The Year Ends!”

Blogmas 7 – Dealing With Your DJ: A 10-Point Guide (Part 2)

Hey folks,

Welcome to Part 2 of my guest blog post for Wunms. If you haven’t already, make sure you read through Part 1 for points 1-5 before reading the points below!


6. Contacting your DJ

When is the best time to contact your DJ? The vast majority of DJs work full- or part-time alongside DJing. Therefore, the best time to contact them is generally on Sunday to Thursday evenings. On Friday and Saturday they are usually DJing. Although they may be used to late nights, it’s good to be courteous and avoid contacting them in the early hours of the morning or late at night. You can contact them by phone call, Whatsapp/text message, email or via social media messaging. Might sound like common sense but you would be surprised how often I get calls at strange times.

I would recommend having at least one full conversation with your DJ. Especially if it’s a big event like a wedding, you should even kindly ask to meet your DJ in person. It’s in the DJ’s interest to get to know you so they can best cater to your style. It’s also in your interest to get to know your DJ so that you can get the best out of them. People often assume that DJs are really outgoing people who like to be the life of the party, but I find often times DJs are generally quite cool-headed, friendly people who just love music and making people happy. In summary, different DJs have different daily availability and personalities to factor into establishing effective communication with them.

7. Before the Event

Following on from contacting your DJ, it’s good to make your DJ aware of anything that will impact his/her ability to perform at your event. Let them know any song requests that you have (more on this in Point 9). Send the DJ a copy of the running order if you have one so that they can plan which music they are going to play at each section of the event. It’s always good to let them know who the host/MC will be if there will be one, as they will likely be working closely together. Think about where the DJ will be positioned in the venue assuming you’ve seen it: they need to be able to see the crowd (ask them for advice if you’re not sure). Agree a time that they will arrive, depending on how long they will need to set up and when you have told guests that the event starts. If in doubt, ask them if they will need anything.

8. During the Event

Focus on getting the best of your DJ. Your conduct can directly impact your DJ’s ability to perform. You want their performance to be optimal so that you get your money’s worth. Encouraging your DJ is a good way to set them at ease and allow them to focus. A DJ set is a performance for the sake of entertainment, and DJs feed off of positive feedback in the same way as any music artist or sportsperson would. Check if they are ok periodically so they have the chance to let you know any issues. Apart from that focus on having a good time.

One mistake that people make sometimes is putting excessive pressure on the DJ. Some pressure can be ok but too much can be highly counter-productive. I recall an event I did where the celebrant started freaking out on the day of the event. They started calling me to bring 6 speakers, even though it was just a house party and one or two speakers was enough. Their anxiety affected me, and this resulted in me being overly cautious about song choices and playing my “floor filler” tracks too early in the night. This resulted in the party peaking too soon and the flow of the event wasn’t so smooth. Yes, I shouldn’t have let the client’s anxiety affect me, but the point here is that once you’ve made your choice, you must trust your DJ.  People love it when DJs get incredible reactions from the crowd and send them into a state of euphoria (which I call “the Zone”). But, DJs aren’t mind controllers (though they are quite close!) and not every event is destined to be super hype. If you followed the steps in my previous blog post, then the chances are you’ve got yourself a capable DJ who will have a plan for the event, so don’t panic if it’s 6pm and no-one’s busting a sweat on the dancefloor yet.

img_8764
DJ Tomiwa providing music for Chinny’s Kitchen pop up Nigerian restaurant. (Food review here)

*Bonus Tip* Feed the DJ. A fed DJ is a happy DJ. A happy DJ performs better. You do the maths 😉

9. Making Requests

This is traditionally a tricky one. If you’ve followed my previous steps, and you would still like to make a request, then it’s likely a good request. DJs like good requests. What DJs don’t like is bad requests :). Making a bad request is one of the most effective ways to get the worst out of your DJ. Wisdom is required. I’ll try and highlight the different between good and bad requests here:

A Good Request 🙂 … A Bad Request 😦 …
Fits the genre that the DJ is playing/will play Is random and confuses the audience/DJ
Is liked by a decent portion of the crowd Is only liked by the requestor
The requestor passionately wants the song to be played The requestor doesn’t really care that much if the song is played or not but they just wanted to make a request
Is for a song that hasn’t been played yet Is for a song that the DJ has played but the requestor wasn’t listening and wants to hear it again
Is for a party track that people can dance to Is for a track that is more appropriate for listening to at home
Includes the accurate song name and artist Is vague and unclear, probably just singing some lines from the song
Is made once and the requestor goes back to enjoying themselves knowing that the DJ will play it when/if they deem appropriate Is made over and over again and demanded to be played immediately
Is a popular, well-known song Is a song that only the requestor knows
Makes the DJ happy Causes the DJ to lose focus and decreases performance
Helps the party go well Kills the party and causes everyone to lose trust in the DJ

DJs tend to factor so many things into their song choices: genre, tempo/bpm (beats per minute), key, song length, client’s preferences, state of the crowd, stage in the event etc. However, don’t be overly discouraged from making requests. Some DJs play all requests whereas some hate them. Personally, I don’t like rejecting song requests. Sadly, there have been countless times when I’ve got hilariously bad requests which distract me unnecessarily. However I have also received many great requests which have enhanced my performance. Moral of the story: think well before requesting!

*Bonus Tip* The most popular request I get is for a socket/charger for people wanting to charge their phones. Personally I don’t mind as I understand that people’s phone die quite quickly nowadays. However not all DJs will agree to this so take note. Also don’t expect the DJ to take responsibility if your phone goes missing afterwards lol. The DJ is focused on their job, which is not taking care of your phone.

10. After the event

It’s nice to thank your DJ for their services. It’s also good to give any honest feedback. If the DJ has done a good job, capitalise on this by developing a relationship so that you can use your DJ for future events and refer them to your friends and help someone else out. Giving consistent business to a DJ could potentially lead to them giving you discounted prices in the future.


Thank you for reading my guide on Dealing with DJs. And thanks to Wunms for allowing me to contribute to her blog!

Do you have any thoughts on these tips? Or maybe some situations that you’ve encountered in the past with DJs that you would like to share? Please let us know in the comments below. I’m also happy to answer any questions.

 

James 3:17 – But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere.

God bless y’all!

DJ Tomiwa


You can follow DJ Tomiwa on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Check out his latest mixes at www.soundcloud.com/djtomiwa.

Listen to his new 80’s Party Mix here: 


photo-28-11-2016-02-02-35

*There are 2 days until Christmas!*


Amazon Affiliate offer:

Christmas shopping made easy – Try Amazon Prime here for free! 

What is Amazon Prime? – Prime members can:

  • Get unlimited, FREE One-Day Delivery on millions of items
  • Enjoy unlimited instant streaming of thousands of movies and TV shows
  • Borrow from thousands of titles from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library
  • Secure, unlimited photo storage with anywhere access

Interested? Enjoy your free 30 day trial today. 

Blogmas 6 – Dealing With Your DJ: A 10-Point Guide (Part 1)

Hey peoples!

So I guess I should introduce myself… I’m Tomiwa, some of you may know me as Omowunmi’s boyfriend. I’m also a DJ and I’ve been doing it for almost 5 years. As it’s #Blogmas and she’s doing a whole bunch of posts, I figured it would be good to chip in and drop some jewels.

As a DJ I’ve come to realise that a lot of people don’t know how to deal with DJs, and I don’t blame them because there are no set rules. DJs vary quite a lot in their operations, styles and personalities, so it’s often difficult to know how to get the best out of your DJ and, in turn, make your event as good as you would like it to be. In this blog post, I hope to shed some light from the perspective of a DJ who has had a variety of clients over the years.

*Disclaimer*: These tips apply mostly in regards to dealing with function/mobile DJs (who cover birthdays, weddings, christenings etc.) as opposed to club DJs – though some tips do apply to both types of DJs.

dj


Continue reading “Blogmas 6 – Dealing With Your DJ: A 10-Point Guide (Part 1)”

Blogmas 5 – How To Make Pretzels (Eat With Arli Recipe)

Hey guys, hope everyone is doing well and feeling festive now that there’s just over a week to go until Christmas.

One of my goals for Blogmas this year was to do some baking. I was so happy that earlier this week I ticked that off my wishlist. My friend The Han Aesthetic, (blogger/Youtube vlogger) and I made pretzels using Eat With Arli’s recipe. Her blog is full of great restaurant reviews and recipes that are pretty easy to follow. I recommend having a look at her blog if you want to cook more for yourself/others.

Anyways, onto the fun part and why you’re reading this I’m assuming – how to bake pretzels! (The Eat With Arli recipe I used makes 8 pretzels).


Ingredients:


Continue reading “Blogmas 5 – How To Make Pretzels (Eat With Arli Recipe)”

Blogmas 4 – W Reads: Purple Hibiscus [Book Review]

Disclaimer: This post contains some affiliate links.

 

Hey guys, hope you’re all doing well and welcome back to Blogmas. Today we’re talking about books. I’m really excited to bring you the first of many book reviews on this blog! This is a spoiler-free review, but just to warn you, I will touch on some general plot points when sharing my opinions.


When my friend Dapo asked me what I wanted for my birthday, at the time I desperately missed reading for leisure like I used to back in school days. So I eagerly sent him a list which featured a couple of books by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. I had already read her book Americanah (mini book review here), so naturally Purple Hibiscus was top of my list. I was really excited to read Purple Hibiscus because it’s a popular and well-reviewed book among my contemporaries.

chimamanda-ngozi-adichie_photo1
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of Purple HibiscusSource: NY Magazine

So when I found myself seriously struggling to get through the first 100 or so pages (and it is 307 pages long), I began to lose hope. But still, I persevered because people kept telling me “it’s a good book”, “it’s amazing!”, “trust me it gets better” etc. I’m glad I did persevere, although I’m not sure that it ever gets “better”. Rather I would argue that it becomes more engaging because of the series of rollercoaster-like traumatic events after the initial slow pace. Continue reading “Blogmas 4 – W Reads: Purple Hibiscus [Book Review]”

Blogmas 3 – A Taste of Chinny’s Kitchen!

Hey guys, how are we all?

If you couldn’t tell by my name (Omowunmi), I am a proudly Nigerian Yoruba girl. There are a million and one things that I love about being Nigerian. Our charisma, our resilience, our many languages… But one of the best things has to be our food. Our richly flavoursome and colourful food is really second to none and I am so grateful to my Mum for raising my brothers and I to be accustomed to it. Bright orange traditional jollof rice or yam pottage; succulent beef suya and pepe soup; golden fried plantain and stew; even the simple agege bread and egg combination. There’s just too much to drool over!


A couple of weeks ago I attended a pop up Nigerian restaurant, The Afrofusion Supper Club by Chinny’s Kitchen.

“Food is my thing and the kitchen is my playground… I started Chinny’s Kitchen because food should be fun no matter what type of diet, budget or culinary challenges you have! I  share ideas, recipes, tips, tricks and food experiences.”

ChinnysKitchen.com

img_8125
Chinny… in the kitchen!

General admission tickets were available on Eventbrite for £29. I know… like me, you’re probably thinking on the face of it, this price seems expensive right? But upon reflection I’d say it was a good deal considering the variety of food for a three-course-meal, drinks, entertainment and the general quality of the event. It was more like a whole West African experience than just a regular night out for dinner.

The event was held in The Table Cafe, London. I really liked the choice of venue, it was the perfect size for an intimate dining experience. The brightly coloured African print cloth (ankara) draped over the tables was a nice little touch also.


Here’s what was on the menu for the evening:

  • Complimentary glass of Zobo champagne or lemonade on arrival
  • Starter: Pepper (pepe) soup served with agege bread; plantain and gizzard (gizzdodo)
  • Mains: Suya “surf n turf” and yam chips; jollof rice and jerk chicken with a side of plantain
  • Dessert: Apple crumble cake served with ice cream
  • Drinks: (Available to order) Zobo Lemonade, Zobo Mojito cocktail, Malt, Chapman, Guinness and wines
  • There was also plenty of complimentary chin chin from Love Chin Chin UK and plantain crisps dotted around all of the tables to snack on between courses


I was able to try all of the above food on the menu and I can honestly say that I thoroughly enjoyed everything. I want to give a special mention to the pepe soup and gizzdodo, because they were both so excellently prepared and I enjoyed them the most. Ooo and the apple crumble cake was phenomenal (if you have me on snapchat, you may have seen me ranting and raving about how delicious it was). The zobo mojito was also really nice (a combination of zobo, malibu and lemonade I believe… whatever it was, I loved it).

Enjoy the photo gallery documenting the evening:


There was plenty of entertainment during the night including a resident DJ and live performances. DJ Tomiwa performed a lively set which took us on a journey of West African music. From highlife and afrobeat artists such as Fela Kuti and Lagbaja, to the early Nigerian pop music of Styl-Plus and Wande Coal, to the contemporary sounds of Mr Eazi and Wizkid. We were also entertained by the incredible voice of the up and coming 19-year-old Nigerian musician, Tay Iwar, who sang music he’d written himself. As well as the talented African drummer, Richard Olatunde Baker, who engaged the audience with his set which included call and response songs such as the popular Che Che Kule. These special guests made waiting for each course to be served a much more enjoyable experience. Personally, I love African music and a great vocalist so it was right up my street.

img_8097


Unfortunately I forgot to take proper pictures of the apple crumble cake dessert because I ate it too quickly, it was that good lol:


Overall the standard and taste of the food and drink wildly surpassed my expectations. I can’t stress it enough, the food was truly fantastic. The only downside is there was a bit of a wait between the courses and the jollof rice was scarce due to complications. Having said that, this is only the first official Chinny’s Kitchen event. Therefore, I am very confident that the next event will be even better as these are logistic issues which should be easily sorted. Regardless, the food was worth the wait and I would recommend that you all dine at Chinny’s Kitchen too.

Find Chinny’s Kitchen on social media:


I plan to recreate some of these West African delicacies for Christmas lunch/dinner this year. What will you all be eating? A traditional roast with turkey, Jollof rice and chicken, or something else? Let’s talk food in the comment section below 🙂

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for human masters, since you know that you will receive an inheritance from the Lord as a reward. It is the Lord Christ you are serving.

Colossians 3:23-24


God bless you!
Wunms.

photo-28-11-2016-02-02-35

*There are 18 days until Christmas!*


Amazon Affiliate offer:

Christmas shopping made easy – Try Amazon Prime here for free! 

What is Amazon Prime? – Prime members can:

  • Get unlimited, FREE One-Day Delivery on millions of items
  • Enjoy unlimited instant streaming of thousands of movies and TV shows
  • Borrow from thousands of titles from the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library
  • Secure, unlimited photo storage with anywhere access

Interested? Enjoy your free 30 day trial today. 

Blogmas 2 – Wearing a Bold Lipstick

Hey everyone,

I hope you’re all well. I’m back today with a quick beauty post and I’ll be talking you through some easy tips to step up your lipstick application from level 50 to 100 lol. It only adds 2 minutes extra to the process of applying lipstick but it makes a noticeable difference. Honestly, truly. So if you want to rock a bold lip this Christmas-New Year-festive period, you can do so with confidence. Absolutely anyone can wear a bold lipstick, the key is in the preparation!

Let’s get straight into tip #1…

img_8213-1 Continue reading “Blogmas 2 – Wearing a Bold Lipstick”

Blogmas 1 – Mental Health: A Problem Shared Is A Problem Halved

Hi guys,

How’s everyone doing? I’m feeling super grateful this morning because we made it to the last month of the year… the final stretch. Yes! It’s December 1st, which means it’s also officially the first day of Blogmas. For my non-blogger readers/anyone who just doesn’t know what Blogmas is… it’s basically a series of blog posts that I publish during the countdown to Christmas. They won’t all necessarily be Christmas related, but it’s an exciting time because it means more content than usual – yay! So here is the first instalment:

Continue reading “Blogmas 1 – Mental Health: A Problem Shared Is A Problem Halved”